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Lord and Thomas Ad Agency – Lord and Thomas Creeds

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Description

To get the propensity of what this is, first let me quote what exactly lord and thomas was:

Quote:

“One Chicago ad agency—Lord & Thomas—overshadowed all the rest, achieving greater national influence and notoriety than any other agency in the United States. Albert Lasker started at Lord & Thomas in 1898, became general manager in 1904 at a salary of $52,000 per year, and within a decade owned the agency. He traveled the city in a yellow chauffeur-driven Rolls Royce and maintained a suburban estate with a staff of 50. Lasker hired the best copywriters in the business and taught them that advertising was “salesmanship in print”—probably the best-known definition of the advertising business in twentieth-century America.

Lasker sold the public on the idea of orange juice (people previously only ate oranges), built brands such as Goodyear and Van de Kamps, established a “records of results” department that monitored its clients’ advertising impact with catalog-response precision, and even used advertising to help defeat Woodrow Wilson’s League of Nations. Advertising legend David Ogilvy rightly ranked Lasker as one of the “six giants of modern advertising.

The most legendary American advertising copywriter was Lord & Thomas’s Claude C. Hopkins. In his popular autobiography, My Life in Advertising (1927), Hopkins captured the populist style of Chicago advertising as literature for the common people. Hopkins is probably the father of consumer advertising for branded goods. He dubbed Schlitz the “beer that made Milwaukee famous,” created unparalleled brand equity for Palmolive soap and Pepsodent toothpaste, wrote the “shot from guns” slogan for Quaker Oats, and invented free product sampling through print coupons. Hopkins penned the most influential book ever written about advertising—Scientific Advertising (1923).

Lasker sold Lord & Thomas in 1942 to three employees (Messrs. Foote, Cone & Belding). Fairfax Cone led the new company into an unparalleled era of creative broadcast advertising. The agency built some of the most successful broadcast advertising brands of all time, including the “Hallmark Hall of Fame,” Clairol’s “Does she or doesn’t she?” and Dial soap’s “Aren’t you glad you use Dial?” Cone’s client-sponsored broadcast programs helped make superstars out of such performers as Frank Sinatra and Bob Hope. Cone also led the Chicago advertising industry into public philanthropy, supporting the University of Chicago, opera, and many other endeavors.

This booklet is 41 different topics with a dozen or so ‘creeds’ Lord and Thomas lived by, and the majority are as relevant today as they were in the 1900’s. We’re talking about legendary copywriters like John E. Kennedy, Claude Hopkins, Albert Lasker…

Everything you read today on copywriting flows in and out of Claude Hopkins teachings, and this was the agency he worked at.

Definitely an essential read, even a glance through, for copywriters.

The 41 Topics covered on Advertising/Copywriting and Strategy:
Exaggeration
Good nature
Service
Not like war
Joy of work
Individuality
Simplicity
Sincerity
Brevity
Good name
Confidence
Self-respect
The golden rule
Picking men
Self-confidence
Efficiency
Imagination
Averages
Diplomacy
Genius
Psychology
Eccentricity
Vanity
Frills
Power
Folderol
Industry
Honesty
Atmosphere
Courage
Caveat emptor
Time
Modesty
Strategy
Mistakes
Gentility
Character
Skeptics
Pacemakers
Basic laws
Self-reliance

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